Glendalough

City of God


Charles Doherty, Linda Doran & Mary Kelly, editors

Hardback €49.50
Catalogue Price: €55.00
ISBN: 978-1-84682-170-7
June 2011. 448pp; large format, colour ills.

'A substantial volume, generously illustrated. Near the end is an amazing chapter by Máirín Ní Cheallaigh describing how, in the late 19th century, Glendalough was almost overwhelmed by tourists and tour operators, who virtually took over the City of God, turning it into a “city of the dead” in accordance with the popular melancholy of the times … like the rest of the book, it features provocative and perceptive writing. It is much more than a guidebook', Noeleen Dowling, Irish Times (19 May 2012).

‘The book contains twenty separate contributions exploring different aspects of one of Ireland’s most spectacular ecclesiastical complexes … The book’s many plates and illustrations include a superb collection of colour photographs taken by Martina Pozdechova', Archaeology Ireland (autumn 2011).

‘Fine photographs by Martina Pozdechova complement fine scholarship and the book is unreservedly recommended', Cormac Burke, Irish Arts Review (winter 2011).

‘There is a wealth of illustration, including little-known drawings and paintings of the site as well as fine colour photographs. This is a substantial and encyclopaedic book', Books Ireland (September 2011).

‘This lavishly illustrated volume is the first study devoted specifically to this iconic site … This engaging collection of essays, to which it is not possible to do full justice within the confines of this review, places readers in the continuing debt of the Society. The editors are to be congratulated for bringing such a significant and handsome production to print; the superb photographs by Martina Pozdechova add materially to the attractiveness of this volume, reasonably priced given the quality and lavishness of the illustrations. It sheds invaluable light not only on Glendalough but also more generally, and equally significantly, on the early Irish church. For all those interested in the early Irish church, it is essential reading', Marie Therese Flanagan, Óenach: FMRSI Reviews (2012).