Medieval Dublin XIII

Proceedings of the Friends of Medieval Dublin symposium 2011


Seán Duffy editor

€22.45
€45.00
Catalogue Price: €24.95
ISBN: 978-1-84682-390-9
Catalogue Price: €50.00
ISBN: 978-1-84682-389-3

December 2013. 332pp; ills.

‘The remarkable series of volumes entitled Medieval Dublin … are based on papers delivered to the annual public conferences of the Friends held in Trinity College, occasions that since the first gathering in 1999 have regularly attracted some of the largest audiences attending any kind of academic history event in the country … the papers in Medieval Dublin XIII are accessible to the non-specialist and the non-medievalist … we have another rich potpourri, a collection where the preponderance of contributors are young scholars … The series remains a rare and welcome cultural phenomenon at a time of dwindling public resources, a worthy advertisement for a great collective endeavour’, David Dickson, Dublin Review of Books (November 2014).

‘Historical and archaeological assessments dominate, but contributions from architecture, literature, heritage management and spatial science add to the richness of the volume … The book remains at the vanguard of new developments in the field of Irish medieval studies, especially as it pertains to the history of Ireland’s capital city. Academic attention has been increasingly focussed on Ireland’s active participation within the medieval world in recent years, and Medieval Dublin XIII provides new work on this topic. In particular, the essays broach the common themes of cultural contact within the city and Dublin’s role in facilitating wider geographic connections’, Vicky McAlister, Studia Hibernica (2014).

‘[This is] a wonderful collection of important studies on the political, social and literary history of Dublin from the Viking Age to the dawn of the modern era. The essays will appeal to both the academic historian and the ordinary reader with an interest in the early years of our capital city … As with the earlier volumes in this series there is much to interest the ordinary reader, the academic and especially, Dubliners or those with connections to our capital city', Michael Merrigan, Ireland's Genealogical Gazette (January 2014).